Earth Has A Strange Hidden Layer Of Tectonic Plates

By photosearth / June 24, 2017
 

Earths tectonic plates are weird as hell. First there werent any, then there was a massive shell, then there were babycontinents, then supercontinents, microcontinents, regular continents, all of them shifting around the Earths crust and changing its appearance, like a very slow inkblot test.

Now, it appears theyre set to get even stranger. A team of researchers led by the University of Houston has concluded that, beneath our worlds tectonic plates, theres another separate layer of independent plates doing their own thing.

Speaking at a joint conference between the Japanese and American Geophysical Unions in Tokyo this week, the team say that theyve been using seismic waves to peer beneath the crust. These waves travel at different speeds through different materials, and as such, researchers can use them to find out whats beneath their feet.

Their research uncovered a mysterious layer present beneath Japan, Korea, and Northeast China, as well as beneath the island of Tonga. Theyre definitely composed of the same material as modern tectonic plates, but theyre found incredibly deep within the mantle. So what are they?

Today’s tectonic plates. USGS

The tectonic plates weve all come to know and love well, except creationists we suppose are found within the lithosphere, the outer shell of a rocky planet, including ours. They are composed of the crust whether thats the less dense continental variety or the dense, submarine oceanic flavor and the upper mantle, a layer of slowly moving, superheated solid rock called the asthenosphere.

This causes them to drift around, bang into each other, grind past each other, and sometimes even destroy each other. That, in essence, is where we were at as of 2017.

However, this new research suggeststhat beneath the seven/eight major tectonic plates resides another layer of them. They appear to be vast, continental-sized segments of ancient plates gliding fairly quickly around a transition zone 440-660 kilometers (about 273-410 miles) beneath the surface.

The base of the regular tectonic plates, at least when theyre flat on the surface, is about 200 kilometers. (124 miles), so the newly discovered ones are way beneath that. So whats going on here?

Its likely that these plates are ancient ones. They would have encountered another tectonic plate during their more shallow existence at a subduction zone. Being denser than the other, they would have sunk beneath their colossal opponent, broken off, and drifted down into the mantle.

The discovery of this new layer of plate tectonics solves a long-standing mystery.

On occasion, incredibly deep-seated earthquakes rock the countries sitting above these plates, but they appeared to be originating from way below any known tectonic plate. You need plates to get quakes, so this has baffling scientists for a while now.

content-1495719630-1280px-earth-cutaway-
The newly discovered tectonic plates are found within the middle section of the mantle (medium orange). USGS

However, this new research has shown that they are probably coming from this new layer of tectonic plates. They may be semi-detached from the primary plates these days, but these enormous slabs can still bend, buckle, and break and cause quakes as they do so. Indeed, their ongoing destruction is so energetic that its causing powerful shockwaves to make it all the way to the surface.

The research has yet to be peer-reviewed, but its looking likely that, once again, Earths hellish depths have been holding back more secrets from us than wed realized.

[H/T: Guardian]

Read more: http://www.iflscience.com/environment/earth-strange-hidden-layer-tectonic-plates/

Save

You can watch ‘Planet Earth 2’ without cablehere’s how

By photosearth / June 24, 2017

The BBC blew away nature buffs when it released its Planet Earth series in 2006 after five years of recording incredibly beautiful footage ofanimals in their remotehabitats.

Now nature is getting another breathtaking closeup in the BBC’s Planet Earth 2. Viewers in the U.K. experienced the sequel, narrated by David Attenborough and with music by Hans Zimmer, on BBC One in late 2016, but many other nature fans around the world are still catching up.

Screengrab via BBC Earth/YouTube

The six-episode series follows the format of the original, focusing episodes on habitats like mountains and grasslands. Within these habitats, the filmmakerszoom in on unique species and natural events, often capturing the stunning drama of our natural world. While the themes are similar to the original, advancements in photography and the incrediblescenes captured by the filmmakers make the sequel just as captivating.One segment from the “Islands” episode even went viral, because watching an iguana run from dozens of hungry snakes is just as intense as it sounds.

It’s clearwhy you’d want to watchPlanet Earth 2,but unfortunately, that’s easier said than doneeven if you have a cable or satellite subscription.

How to watchPlanet Earth 2 with cable

Cable and satellite service subscribers in the U.S. can log into theBBC America websiteor its companion app to stream recent content. The site is trickybecause it seems to indicate that you can stream Planet Earth 2 on demand.

Screengrab via BBC America

I followed the instructions and signed in with my cable provider, which is listed among those supported by BBC America’s website. I had to search to navigate to the Planet Earth 2 page, and when I got there, I spent several frustrating minutes attempting to find a place to play full episodes.


READ MORE:

I never found it. The site’s FAQ section says new episodes are availablefor streaming for a limited time after they air, so my best guess is that because Planet Earth 2 aired in February and March in the U.S., these episodes are no longer available. I emailed a publicist for BBC America to see if I was doing something wrong and to ask when theepisodes might return. I never got a response.

Screengrab via BBC Earth/YouTube

How to watchPlanet Earth 2without cable

So let’s take a look at your other (legal) streaming options. (Spoiler: You’re not going to like them.)

Planet Earth 2 is available to purchase for $2.99 perepisode or $19.99 for the full season in HD on Amazon, Google Play, and other places you canpurchase streaming content like PlayStation store. You can get the standard definition version a bit cheaper, but we recommend HD because it’d be a shame to miss out on the show’s spectacular photography. Cable, satellite, and Sling TV subscribers will rightfully be salty about this option, because who wants to pay twice just to have an on-demand option?

Screengrab via Google Play

If you want to watch Planet Earth 2 right now, buying a digital copy is your best option. Episodes do still run on the BBC America TV channel, but you’ll have to check your local listings to catch them. With a little DVR magic, you may even be able to record most or all of the episodes for a proper binge watch.

If you’re willing to put in some effort to save a few bucks, you can also check your local library for a copy of the Blu-ray. If noneof these options sounds appealing, just sit tight for awhile.The first season Planet Earth is streaming on Netflix, so it’s a good bet that Planet Earth 2 will show up eventually.

Read more: https://www.dailydot.com/parsec/how-to-watch-planet-earth-2/

Save

Save

Save

Save

Traditional Irish Cookery

By photosearth / June 23, 2017

Traditional Irish Cookery

Traditional Irish Cookery

  • Used Book in Good Condition

Ireland has always been renowned for the quality and freshness of its ingredients and the hearty style of its cooking. From mussels and Dublin Bay prawns to succulent beef, wholesome breads and an imaginative range of recipes for potatoes, this attractive and authentic collection offers a selection of recipes which bring to life the flavours of the Emerald Isle. As a practical book for those who love to cook in the Irish style or as a memento of a trip to this fascinating country.

Buy from amazon

List Price: $ 8.95

Price: $ 3.49

Jamie O’Rourke and the Big Potato

By photosearth / June 22, 2017

Jamie O’Rourke and the Big Potato

Jamie O'Rourke and the Big Potato

  • Great product!

“Illustrated in dePaola’s signature style, this has an inviting look. Buoyant watercolors are framed by thin orange borders….An engaging read-aloud choice for St. Patrick’s Day.” — BooklistA Cheery picture book, with the artist using the lighter, brighter side of his palette….Attractive and amusing.” — Kirkus Reviews“Jamie O’Rourke is the laziest man in all of Ireland.” So begins well-known children’s book author and illustrator Tomie dePaola’s retelling of a popular Irish folktale. Jamie is accustomed to his wife doing all the household and garden chores, so when she injures her back, he figures he’s sure to starve to death. But as luck would have it, he chances upon a leprechaun. The elfin man offers Jamie the biggest “pratie” in the world in exchange for letting him go.

Feeling self-satisfied, Jamie plants the seed, which soon grows into a potato big enough to be a logistical nightmare for the village. Luckily, his wife comes through for him once again, and everyone ends up happy and full. This is not a redemptive tale–Jamie does not learn to be industrious. It is, however, a lively, simple-yet-outlandish, brightly illustrated story about a man and a potato, with a leprechaun thrown in, for luck. (Ages 4 to 8)

Buy from amazon

List Price: $ 6.99

Price: $ 3.84

Food for the Dead: On the Trail of New England’s Vampires

By photosearth / June 21, 2017

Food for the Dead: On the Trail of New England’s Vampires

Food for the Dead: On the Trail of New England's Vampires

  • Used Book in Good Condition

Forget Bela Lugosi’s Count Dracula. In nineteenth-century New England another sort of vampire was relentlessly ravishing the populace, or so it was believed by many rural communities suffering the plague of tuberculosis. Indeed, as this fascinating book shows, the vampire of folk superstition figures significantly in the attempt of early Americans to reasonably explain and vanquish the dreaded affliction then known as consumption. In gripping narrative detail, folklorist Michael E. Bell reconstructs a distant world, where on March 17, 1892, three corpses were exhumed from a Rhode Island cemetery. One of them, Mercy Brown, who had succumbed to consumption, appeared to have turned over in her grave. Mercy’s family cut out her heart, which still held clots of blood, burned it on a nearby rock, and fed the ashes to her ailing brother. To Mercy’s community she had become a vampire living a spectral existence and consuming the vitality of her siblings. From documents written as early as 1790 to a recent conversation with a descendant of Mercy Brown, Bell investigates twenty cases in which the vampiric dead were exhumed to save the ailing living. He also explores a widespread folk tradition that has survived generations, as ordinary people today strive to battle extraordinary diseases like Ebola or AIDS with a deeply rooted belief in their power to heal themselves. “Bell’s absorbing account is … a major contribution to the study of New England folk beliefs.”—Boston Globe “Filled with ghostly tales, glowing corpses, rearranged bones, visits to hidden graveyards…. This is a marvelous book.”—Providence Journal

Buy from amazon

List Price: $ 26.00

Price: $ 30.00

Irish cooking like an adventure. Cookbook: 25 Recipes for every day.

By photosearth / June 20, 2017

Irish cooking like an adventure. Cookbook: 25 Recipes for every day.

Irish cooking like an adventure. Cookbook: 25 Recipes for every day.

Reading through the book, you will realize that Irish recipes give you light and also the most delicious foods which are also very easy to prepare. According to research, the potato makes up as the Irish people’s staple food, and they have used different skills to make it fit into several types of meals. This book is subdivided into two chapters all of which contains various types of recipes including Irish soups, dishes with meat, stew vegetables, dishes with potatoes and lastly Irish desserts. All these recipes have been researched to ensure that they easily fit into your daily meals.

Buy from amazon

Price:

Commencement 2017

By photosearth / June 20, 2017

Caltech's 123rd annual commencement
News Writer: 
Lori Dajose

photo of Mae Jemison speaking at Caltech's 2017 Commencement

Mae Jemison speaks at Caltech's 2017 Commencement
Credit: Caltech

On Friday, June 16, David Lee (PhD ’74), chair of the Caltech Board of Trustees, opened the Institute’s 123rd annual commencement ceremony with a reminder that discovery is a never-ending process. “Accomplishment and discovery never close the door on inquiry. Rather, they open new worlds to explore,” he remarked. “So too does the end of your time at Caltech mark the beginning of new challenges and triumphs in your studies, in your careers, and in your lives among the friends and family with us today.”

Lee noted some of the past year’s achievements, such as the discovery of a link between the microbiome and Parkinson’s disease, the third LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory) detection of gravitational waves, the creation of the Tianqiao and Chrissy Chen Institute for Neuroscience at Caltech, and the final flybys of Saturn by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s Cassini mission. He also thanked Edward M. Stolper, the William E. Leonhard Professor of Geology and the Carl and Shirley Larson Provostial Chair, for his service to Caltech as provost, as Stolper’s tenure comes to a close this year.

The 2017 Caltech commencement speaker was Mae Jemison, an engineer, physician, and NASA astronaut.

“I believe that life is best when we live deeply, and look up,” Jemison said to the graduates. “You don’t have to go up to space to feel deeply, to feel infinite. If we dig deep we have the ability to do wonderful things.”

Looking up, Jemison said, allows us to remember that there is more that connects us than divides us. “Connection to the greater universe is something I hope for you throughout your lives. Never forget to look up and keep the bigger picture in mind. Look up at the sky, the moon, the stars when you need to recharge. Let the gravity of Earth give you a warm hug when you’re feeling low. Look up to remember what inspires you. Keep the sparkle in your eyes, keep it long past graduation.”

In his closing charge to the graduating class, Caltech president Thomas Rosenbaum, the Sonja and William Davidow Presidential Chair and professor of physics, remarked, “You will move through life shaped by your time here, creating new spaces for yourself. I wish you wholeness and magic on your journey forward.”

In addition to 254 Bachelor of Science, 122 Master of Science, one Engineer, and 180 Doctor of Philosophy degrees, four students were honored with prizes at the ceremony.

Nikita Sirohi graduated with a BS in computer science and was the recipient of the 32nd annual Mabel Beckman Prize in recognition of “academic and personal excellence, contributions to the Institute community, and outstanding character and leadership.” In the fall, Sirohi will join Pure Storage, a data storage company in Mountain View, California.

Robert (Bobby) Sanchez graduated with a BS in geophysics with a minor in environmental science and engineering and was the recipient of the Hinrichs Memorial Award. The award is presented to the senior or seniors who have made the greatest contribution to the student body during their undergraduate years, “students of outstanding character, leadership, and responsibility.” He plans to attend the Scripps Institute of Oceanography in La Jolla, California, where he will pursue a PhD in physical oceanography.

The George W. Housner Award was presented to Suchita Nety. The prize is given to a senior who has demonstrated “excellence in scholarship and in the preparation of an outstanding piece of original scientific research.” Nety received a bachelor’s degree in chemistry with a minor in English and will attend the MD/PhD program at the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology starting this fall.

Finally, the Milton and Francis Clauser Doctoral Prize was awarded to Sho Takatori for his doctoral thesis, “Forces, Stresses and the (Thermo?) Dynamics of Active Matter: The Swim Pressure.” The Clauser Prize is awarded to a student whose PhD thesis, completed within the previous 12 months, reflects “extraordinary standards of quality, innovative research, ingenuity, and especially the potential of opening new avenues of human thought and endeavor.” After graduation, Takatori will work as a Miller Research Fellow at UC Berkeley. From there, he will join the chemical engineering faculty at UC Santa Barbara.

Caltech News tagged with “GPS”

Bread Making 101: Get Your Dose of Daily Bread with Over 25 Mouthwatering Bread Recipes You Can’t Resist!

By photosearth / June 19, 2017

Bread Making 101: Get Your Dose of Daily Bread with Over 25 Mouthwatering Bread Recipes You Can’t Resist!

Bread Making 101: Get Your Dose of Daily Bread with Over 25 Mouthwatering Bread Recipes You Can’t Resist!

If you are a huge fan of bread or have been looking for the ultimate bread cookbook that will help give your dose of daily bread, then you certainly can’t go wrong with this book.

Inside of this book you will find not only some of the simplest and easiest bread recipes you will ever find, but you will also discover a few tips to making even the most complicated bread recipes from scratch in just a matter of a few step.

So, what are you waiting for?

Get a copy of this book and start making your favorite bread dishes today!

==> Buy this book today and get a big bonus cookbook collection inside!!! <==

ON SALE LIMITED TIME ONLY!!! Get FREE BONUS content with your download! Click the Download with 1-Click Button at the top right of the screen or “Read FREE with Kindle Unlimited” now!

Buy from amazon

Price:

The Little Book of Japanese Whisky: A fast guide to the finest of all drinks!

By photosearth / June 18, 2017

The Little Book of Japanese Whisky: A fast guide to the finest of all drinks!

The Little Book of Japanese Whisky: A fast guide to the finest of all drinks!

What? Whisky made in Japan? Seriously?

This is the kind of remark one often heard in the past when people (especially in the West) were offered an alternative to Scottish whisky. But times have changed, and you may now happen to hear more often something like:

What? You ran out of my favorite Yamazaki? Seriously?

Some people first learned that Japan was making whisky with Lost in Translation, a Sofia Coppola movie from 2003.
Many people, however, still do not realize that Japan is the world’s third largest producer of whisky behind the Scots and the Americans, effectively above the Irish.

But what makes Japanese whisky so special that it is now one of the most expensive spirits worldwide?

What are the differences from a Scottish (or American) whisky?

How come the Whisky Bible, the best-known book in the whisky world, elected a Japanese whisky, Yamazaki Sherry Cask 2013, its 2015 World Whisky of the Year?

We’ll see all this and more in The Little Book of Japanese Whisky!

Answering these questions will lead us through a fascinating journey into the (drinking) culture of Japan from its origins all the way to the creation of one of the most refined spirits ever produced by mankind.
Whether you’re a whisky aficionado or not even a drinker, whether you’re a Nippon fan or simply curious about the story behind some of the most expensive spirits in the world, you’ll enjoy reading the Little Book of Japanese Whisky!

Grab a copy now and join us in the real world of Japanese whisky lovers!

Kampai!!!

Buy from amazon

Price:

Caltech Faculty Receive Named Professorships

By photosearth / June 18, 2017

Twenty-five professors are recognized with the Institute’s highest honor

General campus image

View the Slideshow

During the 2016-17 academic year, Caltech recognized 25 faculty members with the Institute’s most distinguished award for individual faculty—a named professorship. This honor provides faculty with additional funds and resources to pursue their best ideas while continuing to mentor future generations of leaders.

Each named professorship brings with it its own distinct legacy. Many chairs, for instance, have longstanding histories, and pass through each appointment a tradition of exploration and discovery from one academic generation to the next, from one colleague to another. Chairs sometimes also provide faculty with an opportunity to forge meaningful relationships with the philanthropists who provided the donation that made the endowed chair possible.

Caltech is pleased to present the 2016-2017 cohort of named professors.

 

Caltech News tagged with “GPS”

Page 3 of 29