Commencement 2017

By photosearth / June 20, 2017

Caltech's 123rd annual commencement
News Writer: 
Lori Dajose

photo of Mae Jemison speaking at Caltech's 2017 Commencement

Mae Jemison speaks at Caltech's 2017 Commencement
Credit: Caltech

On Friday, June 16, David Lee (PhD ’74), chair of the Caltech Board of Trustees, opened the Institute’s 123rd annual commencement ceremony with a reminder that discovery is a never-ending process. “Accomplishment and discovery never close the door on inquiry. Rather, they open new worlds to explore,” he remarked. “So too does the end of your time at Caltech mark the beginning of new challenges and triumphs in your studies, in your careers, and in your lives among the friends and family with us today.”

Lee noted some of the past year’s achievements, such as the discovery of a link between the microbiome and Parkinson’s disease, the third LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory) detection of gravitational waves, the creation of the Tianqiao and Chrissy Chen Institute for Neuroscience at Caltech, and the final flybys of Saturn by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s Cassini mission. He also thanked Edward M. Stolper, the William E. Leonhard Professor of Geology and the Carl and Shirley Larson Provostial Chair, for his service to Caltech as provost, as Stolper’s tenure comes to a close this year.

The 2017 Caltech commencement speaker was Mae Jemison, an engineer, physician, and NASA astronaut.

“I believe that life is best when we live deeply, and look up,” Jemison said to the graduates. “You don’t have to go up to space to feel deeply, to feel infinite. If we dig deep we have the ability to do wonderful things.”

Looking up, Jemison said, allows us to remember that there is more that connects us than divides us. “Connection to the greater universe is something I hope for you throughout your lives. Never forget to look up and keep the bigger picture in mind. Look up at the sky, the moon, the stars when you need to recharge. Let the gravity of Earth give you a warm hug when you’re feeling low. Look up to remember what inspires you. Keep the sparkle in your eyes, keep it long past graduation.”

In his closing charge to the graduating class, Caltech president Thomas Rosenbaum, the Sonja and William Davidow Presidential Chair and professor of physics, remarked, “You will move through life shaped by your time here, creating new spaces for yourself. I wish you wholeness and magic on your journey forward.”

In addition to 254 Bachelor of Science, 122 Master of Science, one Engineer, and 180 Doctor of Philosophy degrees, four students were honored with prizes at the ceremony.

Nikita Sirohi graduated with a BS in computer science and was the recipient of the 32nd annual Mabel Beckman Prize in recognition of “academic and personal excellence, contributions to the Institute community, and outstanding character and leadership.” In the fall, Sirohi will join Pure Storage, a data storage company in Mountain View, California.

Robert (Bobby) Sanchez graduated with a BS in geophysics with a minor in environmental science and engineering and was the recipient of the Hinrichs Memorial Award. The award is presented to the senior or seniors who have made the greatest contribution to the student body during their undergraduate years, “students of outstanding character, leadership, and responsibility.” He plans to attend the Scripps Institute of Oceanography in La Jolla, California, where he will pursue a PhD in physical oceanography.

The George W. Housner Award was presented to Suchita Nety. The prize is given to a senior who has demonstrated “excellence in scholarship and in the preparation of an outstanding piece of original scientific research.” Nety received a bachelor’s degree in chemistry with a minor in English and will attend the MD/PhD program at the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology starting this fall.

Finally, the Milton and Francis Clauser Doctoral Prize was awarded to Sho Takatori for his doctoral thesis, “Forces, Stresses and the (Thermo?) Dynamics of Active Matter: The Swim Pressure.” The Clauser Prize is awarded to a student whose PhD thesis, completed within the previous 12 months, reflects “extraordinary standards of quality, innovative research, ingenuity, and especially the potential of opening new avenues of human thought and endeavor.” After graduation, Takatori will work as a Miller Research Fellow at UC Berkeley. From there, he will join the chemical engineering faculty at UC Santa Barbara.

Caltech News tagged with “GPS”

Bread Making 101: Get Your Dose of Daily Bread with Over 25 Mouthwatering Bread Recipes You Can’t Resist!

By photosearth / June 19, 2017

Bread Making 101: Get Your Dose of Daily Bread with Over 25 Mouthwatering Bread Recipes You Can’t Resist!

Bread Making 101: Get Your Dose of Daily Bread with Over 25 Mouthwatering Bread Recipes You Can’t Resist!

If you are a huge fan of bread or have been looking for the ultimate bread cookbook that will help give your dose of daily bread, then you certainly can’t go wrong with this book.

Inside of this book you will find not only some of the simplest and easiest bread recipes you will ever find, but you will also discover a few tips to making even the most complicated bread recipes from scratch in just a matter of a few step.

So, what are you waiting for?

Get a copy of this book and start making your favorite bread dishes today!

==> Buy this book today and get a big bonus cookbook collection inside!!! <==

ON SALE LIMITED TIME ONLY!!! Get FREE BONUS content with your download! Click the Download with 1-Click Button at the top right of the screen or “Read FREE with Kindle Unlimited” now!

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The Little Book of Japanese Whisky: A fast guide to the finest of all drinks!

By photosearth / June 18, 2017

The Little Book of Japanese Whisky: A fast guide to the finest of all drinks!

The Little Book of Japanese Whisky: A fast guide to the finest of all drinks!

What? Whisky made in Japan? Seriously?

This is the kind of remark one often heard in the past when people (especially in the West) were offered an alternative to Scottish whisky. But times have changed, and you may now happen to hear more often something like:

What? You ran out of my favorite Yamazaki? Seriously?

Some people first learned that Japan was making whisky with Lost in Translation, a Sofia Coppola movie from 2003.
Many people, however, still do not realize that Japan is the world’s third largest producer of whisky behind the Scots and the Americans, effectively above the Irish.

But what makes Japanese whisky so special that it is now one of the most expensive spirits worldwide?

What are the differences from a Scottish (or American) whisky?

How come the Whisky Bible, the best-known book in the whisky world, elected a Japanese whisky, Yamazaki Sherry Cask 2013, its 2015 World Whisky of the Year?

We’ll see all this and more in The Little Book of Japanese Whisky!

Answering these questions will lead us through a fascinating journey into the (drinking) culture of Japan from its origins all the way to the creation of one of the most refined spirits ever produced by mankind.
Whether you’re a whisky aficionado or not even a drinker, whether you’re a Nippon fan or simply curious about the story behind some of the most expensive spirits in the world, you’ll enjoy reading the Little Book of Japanese Whisky!

Grab a copy now and join us in the real world of Japanese whisky lovers!

Kampai!!!

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Caltech Faculty Receive Named Professorships

By photosearth / June 18, 2017

Twenty-five professors are recognized with the Institute’s highest honor

General campus image

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During the 2016-17 academic year, Caltech recognized 25 faculty members with the Institute’s most distinguished award for individual faculty—a named professorship. This honor provides faculty with additional funds and resources to pursue their best ideas while continuing to mentor future generations of leaders.

Each named professorship brings with it its own distinct legacy. Many chairs, for instance, have longstanding histories, and pass through each appointment a tradition of exploration and discovery from one academic generation to the next, from one colleague to another. Chairs sometimes also provide faculty with an opportunity to forge meaningful relationships with the philanthropists who provided the donation that made the endowed chair possible.

Caltech is pleased to present the 2016-2017 cohort of named professors.

 

Caltech News tagged with “GPS”

An Irish Country Cookbook (Thorndike Large Print Lifestyles)

By photosearth / June 17, 2017

An Irish Country Cookbook (Thorndike Large Print Lifestyles)

An Irish Country Cookbook (Thorndike Large Print Lifestyles)

From New York Times, USA Today, and Globe and Mail bestselling author Patrick Taylor comes ten new short stories in the popular An Irish Country series paired with more than 150 delicious Irish family recipes in An Irish Country Cookbook.

Told from the perspective of beloved housekeeper Kinky Kincaid, one of the cherished starring characters in Taylor s An Irish Country series, An Irish Country Cookbook explores Ireland s rich culture through its delicious dishes and stories of its charming people. These authentic tried-and-true family recipes have been passed down from generation to generation, and are the original comfort food for millions. Organized into sections such as: starters, soups, breads, mains, sides, sauces, desserts, cakes, candy and treats, and Ulster Christmas recipes, this cookbook brings the magic of Irish cooking and time-honored Irish traditions to life.

The ten short stories starring Dr. Fingal Flahertie O’Reilly, Dr. Barry Laverty, and the colorful village of Ballybucklebo will delight fans of the series and new readers alike. From starters to sauces, Irish soda bread to Christmas dinner, these memorable dishes will bring a taste of the world of the Irish Country books to every kitchen.

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List Price: $ 32.99

Price: $ 28.27

Break Through Prospers

By photosearth / June 17, 2017

photo of Ruthwick and Sathwick Pathireddy

Ruthwick and Sathwick Pathireddy
Credit: Caltech

Break Through, publicly launched just over a year ago, is already the most successful campaign in Caltech’s history. In the first year of the public phase alone, gifts exceeded $ 400 million. And total contributions—over $ 1.4 billion—have surpassed the goal of Caltech’s last campaign.

This support comes from new friends as well as those who know Caltech best: its faculty, trustees, students, alumni, staff, and Associates members. More than 10,000 donors have responded generously to the campaign’s message that “a few can change the world.”

Go to the Break Through site to see more statistics from the campaign’s first anniversary and view a slideshow sampling what people on campus are saying as campaign gifts help Caltech realize core aspirations.

Caltech News tagged with “GPS”

Irish Food & Folklore

By photosearth / June 16, 2017

Irish Food & Folklore

Irish Food & Folklore (Food & Folklore)

The Food & Folklore Series brings to life the traditions, folklore, and cooking styles of some of the world’s most beloved cuisines. Each title begins with an introduction to the history and culture, then offers over 100 authentic recipes with helpful glossary and tips. Throughout the books, the recipes are illustrated with beautiful color photography paired with evocative black-and-white images of the people and countryside. A unique collection of culinary and cultural lore, as delicious as it is fascinating!

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AGEP Postdocs Reflect on Experiences

By photosearth / June 16, 2017

Three postdoctoral scholars in the AGEP program are moving on to the next steps in their careers
News Writer: 
Lori Dajose

From left to right: Jessica Hinojosa, Mark Torres, Jessica Watkins

From left to right: Jessica Hinojosa, Mark Torres, Jessica Watkins

In September 2013, Caltech, UC Berkeley, UCLA, and Stanford University founded a new consortium—the California Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professoriate (AGEP)—to support underrepresented minority (URM) graduate students and postdoctoral scholars in the STEM fields of mathematics, the physical sciences, computer science, and engineering. The alliance, launched through a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF), was created to address the fact that minority students enter STEM fields in disproportionately low numbers and that, as a group, their progress slows at each step in their academic careers.

“AGEP is one of the few focused programs that’s intentional about changing the demographics of faculty,” says Hanna Song, Caltech’s senior director for diversity. “Each of these scholars is at the top of their game. This program brings them together for their postdoctoral journey in a cohort-like model and pairs them with principal investigators who are committed to making sure the scholars have everything they need to go on to become faculty, should they wish to do so.”

In addition to mentoring and support at individual universities, AGEP hosts a yearly retreat for graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, research scientists, and faculty from the four participating institutions.

“This has really been an extraordinary cohort of postdocs, and it has been a privilege to work with them and help them prepare for their future professional career,” says Doug Rees, principal investigator on the AGEP grant, Caltech’s dean of graduate studies and the Roscoe Gilkey Dickinson Professor of Chemistry. “In addition to the NSF funding, we have been fortunate to have support from President Rosenbaum [the Sonja and William Davidow Presidential Chair and professor of physics], provost Ed Stolper [the William E. Leonhard Professor of Geology and Carl and Shirley Larson Provostial Chair], division chairs, and individual faculty. We have really been able to bring in a range of resources to support these postdocs.”

Three of the AGEP postdocs are now moving on to the next steps in their careers. We asked them to describe career goals and lessons learned, and to give advice to the next generation of scientists.

Jessica Hinojosa

Hinojosa’s work in the laboratory of Professor of Geobiology Alex Sessions used sediment cores from New Zealand lakes to understand climate dynamics in the Southern Hemisphere.

I will be starting a position at Shell as an organic geochemist. Although I’m moving to the private sector, I still love research and academia and would like to stay connected to that world. AGEP has been an amazing networking resource as I navigated the next step in my career. Both at Caltech and the annual retreat, I have met some wonderful people through this program. I hope to maintain those contacts as my career progresses.

If I could give advice to aspiring URM scientists, I would say—let your unique background be one of your strengths. At times, it can be intimidating to be in a room of people that look different from you, but that means you have a perspective that they may not. Keep fighting the uphill battle until the upper echelons of academia and other STEM industries look as diverse as we know they should be.

Mark Torres

Working with Professor of Geobiology Woody Fischer and Professor of Geology Michael Lamb, Torres studied the role of river floodplain dynamics in the global carbon and oxygen cycles.

I am starting a tenure-track assistant professorship in the earth science department at Rice University. My appointment there will begin in July and I’ll be building a new biogeochemistry laboratory. The AGEP program provided me with a lot of support, especially through AGEP principal investigators Doug Rees and Cindy Weinstein [Eli and Edythe Broad Professor of English, vice provost, and chief diversity officer] who were always there to give advice when needed.

My advice to any aspiring scientists would be to seek out all funding opportunities for which you are eligible and to apply to all of them. There are lots of poorly advertised resources out there that are available to support your career. While it takes time to fill out all of the applications, the act of applying itself is a great way to organize one’s thoughts.

Jessica Watkins

Working with John Grotzinger, the Fletcher Jones Professor of Geology and Ted and Ginger Jenkins Leadership Chair of the Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, Watkins studied the stratigraphy and structure of Gale Crater on Mars.

Post Caltech, I will be moving to Houston to begin training as an astronaut. My ultimate goal is broadly to contribute to planetary and human exploration through participation in NASA missions. My time as an AGEP fellow at Caltech working on the NASA Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover has fostered my interest in, as well as prepared me for, this type of role, and I am excited about where this goal may lead me! One of the most important impacts the AGEP program has had on my career is the network of several top-tier academic institutions it has enabled me to access and build from, both during my tenure at Caltech and moving forward. Also, the space that the AGEP program has provided, particularly at the annual retreat, to consider my identity as a URM scientist and create community amongst other URM scientists has been invaluable thus far and will certainly continue to be so in the future. 

The advice I would give to aspiring URM scientists would be to find something you are passionate about and pursue it relentlessly! There are always open doors if you are willing to work hard enough to find them.

 

The AGEP program is administered at Caltech by the Caltech Center for Diversity. The Center recently received the Caltech Team Impact Award for its efforts to increase inclusion and representation throughout the Institute.

Caltech News tagged with “GPS”

Restaurants in Ireland

By photosearth / June 16, 2017

When you go to any country you are going to want to eat. The best guide to help you find out where to eat in Ireland is the 100 Best Restaurants 2017 John and Sally McKennas’ Guides. Ths will help you find all the best places to eat, shop and stay in Ireland. It is a local guide to local places.
http://www.guides.ie/100bestrestaurants

The Best Restaurants in Dublin by Andy Hayler.
Read more restaurant reviews at www.foodiez.tv

Cinema ModeOff. Cafes and Restaurants in Belfast. This video shows you the lovely cafes and restaurants in Belfast, Northern Ireland.

Off-Menu: Dublin

Among the global cities vying for the title of Best Cuisine, one may assume Dublin is an underdog. But to discount Ireland’s largest city would be a big mistake. In Dublin, local chefs embrace the bounty of the Emerald Isle. Verdant fields yield impeccable produce, and the coastal waters offer the freshest, finest seafood. The restaurant scene is multi-faceted; elevated, but not fussy. Simple, but not boring. Join Aida as she travels to Fishshop, The Pig’s Ear, and Chapter One.
Presented by Chase Sapphire Preferred®.

Irish Traditional Cooking: Over 300 Recipes from Ireland’s Heritage

Irish Traditional Cooking: Over 300 Recipes from Ireland's Heritage

Ireland’s rich culinary heritage is brought to life in this new edition of Darina’s bestselling Irish Traditional Cooking. With 300 traditional dishes, including 100 new recipes, this is the most comprehensive and entertaining tome on the subject. Each recipe is accompanied with tips, tales, historical insights and common Irish customs, many of which have been passed down from one generation to the next. Darina’s fascination with Ireland’s culinary heritage is illustrated with chapters on Broths & Soups, Fish, Game, Vegetables and Cakes & Biscuits. She uses the finest of Ireland’s natural produce to give us recipes such as Sea Spinach Soup, Potted Ballycotton Shrimps with Melba Toast and Rhubarb Fool.
First published nearly twenty years ago, and now extensively revised and updated, this new edition allows Darina Allen to share her enthusiasm for Ireland’s fresh, wholesome, seasonal food with a new generation of cooks.

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Irish Country Cooking

By photosearth / June 16, 2017

Irish Times The 100 best places to eat in Ireland
From fish-finger sandwiches to fine dining, we recommend the restaurants and cafes serving the best food in the country.


Chef Mooney shows you how to make an Irish Stew

More than 100 Recipes for Today’s Table

Irish Country Cooking: More than 100 Recipes for Today's TableRediscover the simple pleasures of a home-cooked meal, Irish-style. This fresh and appealing collection presents tried-and-true family recipes shared by local moms and grandmothers. The dishes range from distinctly traditional Irish fare (often with interesting twists) to those with international influences. Enjoy Brown Soda Bread, Fragrant Chicken Curry, Braised Derrynaflan Brisket, Sweet Fruit Scones with homemade jam, and much, much more.

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