Irish Cooking Bible

Irish Cooking Bible

Irish Cooking Bible

Bring the magic of Irish cooking to your own kitchen with the Irish Cooking Bible-more than 120 delicious recipes for simple country fare.
Start with memorable breakfast dishes, such as Raisin Oat Scones, Corned Beef Hash or Irish Whiskey Cured Salmon. Or savor pub food classics like Lamb and Vegetable Pie, Beef Stew and Mussels in Beer Broth. You’ll find everything from hearty soups and homemade breads to simple salads, sides and desserts.
More than 80 full-page color photographs

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The Vikings in Ireland and Beyond

The Vikings in Ireland and Beyond: Before and After the Battle of Clontarf (Pathways to Our Past)

The Vikings in Ireland and Beyond: Before and After the Battle of Clontarf (Pathways to Our Past)

This book contains contributions by many leading scholars in Viking studies from Ireland, Britain, and Scandinavia, on diverse subjects including archaeological excavation, art historical analysis, linguistics, literature, politics, historical sources, numismatics, environmental remains, human remains, and artifact studies from c.795 to 1170. Aimed at both the non-specialist and the specialist reader, the book will prove to be a landmark publication in Viking studies for years to come. ***Chosen as an Outstanding Academic Title for 2016 by Choice Magazine!! *** “This book takes a textual and archaeological look at the Viking presence in Ireland from its early ninth-century beginnings to 12th-century cultural memories. The Battle of Clontarf in 1014 is a chronological anchor but not a focal point of the collection. The publication boasts color photographs, an index of proper names (only), and a solid introductory essay. A valuable, updated resource for Viking scholars and students.” — Choice, Vol. 53, No. 7, March 2016 [Subject: History, Medieval Studies, Archaeology, Viking Studies, Irish Studies]

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The Vikings In Ireland

These Scandinavians were known both as great warriors and sailors who travelled in long ships. They started their raids in France, Britain and then to Ireland in AD 790. The isolated island monasteries made easy and fruitful pickings for these raiders. Initially they only attacked within 20 miles of the coast and only later did they start to move further inland. The first recorded Viking attack took place in Ireland in AD795. They lasted for several decades and they managed to establish base camps in Dublin, a major port. The Gaelic Ireland they invaded found itself without any political structure to face such a well organized and aggressive foe.

With a sound base they then began about conquering Ireland; however the Irish Kings started a fight back and forced the Vikings to return and consolidate their positions in Dublin, Wexford, and Waterford. These various Viking settlements began to develop into small kingdoms of their own throughout Ireland, and just compounded the existing series of power struggles, that already existed between the various kings. Once the Vikings started to settle in Ireland, they did of course become more prone to attack from the already feuding kings.

In AD 914 a huge Viking presence arrived in Waterford and a new campaign began, where they attacked Munster and Leinster and defeated the Ui Neills. The Viking age lasted until the 11th Century and they introduced money to Irish society. The fact that they had settled in Ireland meant that they actually contributed to Irish society, not only through coinage, but also in advanced shipping techniques and in trading.

Until the Vikings had introduced a currency the main bartering tool was cows. Not only did they provide food and hides, but they were also heavily used for buying, selling and the exchange of goods. There is even today a strong sense of the Viking influence, especially in Dublin. There is a very good Viking tour that takes place there and if you have the opportunity, it is worth taking this to understand how the River Liffey in Dublin, made the Viking attacks possible.

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The Vikings in Ireland Papers

The Vikings in Ireland Papers

The Vikings in Ireland

This compilation of 13 papers by scholars from Ireland, England and Denmark, consider the extent and nature of Viking influence in Ireland. Created in close association with exhibitions held at the National Musem of Ireland in 1998-99 and at the National Ship Museum in Roskilde in 2001, the papers discuss aspects of religion, art, literature and placenames, towns and society, drawing together thoughts on the exchange of culture and ideas in Viking Age Ireland and the extent to which existing identities were maintained, lost or assimilated.

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The Vikings in Ireland

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The Vikings in Ireland

A short documentary detailing what life might have been like for Viking settlers coming to Ireland.
Produced by AppleBox Media for Mary Immaculate College, Limerick.

https://www.facebook.com/maryimmaculatecollegeireland/

 

The Vikings in Britain and Ireland

The Vikings in Britain and Ireland

    BRITISH MUSEUM PRESS

For nearly three hundred years, from the end of the eighth century AD until approximately 1100, the Vikings set out from Scandinavia across the northern world a dramatic time that would change Europe forever. This book explores the Viking conquest and settlement across Britain and Ireland, covering the core period of Viking activity from the first Viking raids to the raids of Magnus Barelegs, king of Norway. This lively history looks at the impact of the Viking forces, the development of societies within their settlements, their trades and beliefs, language and their interactions with native peoples. Drawing on the superb collection of the British Museum, together with other finds, sites and monuments, The Vikings in Britain and Ireland is a richly-illustrated introduction to the culture, daily life and times of the Vikings and their legacy which is still visible today.

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The Vikings in Ireland and Beyond

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The Vikings in Ireland, how the Vikings influenced art, trade and the growth of cities

The Vikings in Ireland

The Vikings in Ireland

In Irish history the Vikings are often seen merely as attackers, but this book gives an account of the wider picture – how the Vikings significantly influenced Irish art and trade and the growth of towns and cities. It describes their first landing as a raiding party, and their settlement and gradual merging with the Irish by intermarriage and trade, and also explores the customs and traditions, and the arts and crafts which have become part of the Irish way of life. Cameos of the lives of individual Vikings – some real, some fictitious – are used in the retelling of events, and the illustrations include photographs of excavations and artefacts.

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Who Is Saint Patrick?

The Vikings in Ireland and Beyond

The Vikings in Ireland, how the Vikings influenced art, trade and the growth of cities.

 

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Who Is Saint Patrick?

St. Patrick’s Day Parade Dublin 2016 by Ireland Travel Advice

St Patrick is the patron saint of Ireland. His feast day is celebrated on 17th March every year and there are parades held on this day right across the world. There are many known facts about the man but there are even more myths and legends that have gathered up over the years. Generally the Irish are a superstitious people and even though we know most of these myths not to be true, you will be hard pushed to find anyone in Ireland who will actually openly deny that to be the case.

Saint Patrick depicted with shamrock in detail of stained glass window in St. Benin’s Church, Kilbennan, County Galway, Ireland. Photo by Andreas F. Borchert.

Who Is Saint Patrick?

I will begin with the facts that we do know of. He was actually born in Scotland and was also known to have wealthy parents called Calpurnius and Conchessa who were Romans. Nothing is clear from history of the precise year in which he was born but it is estimated that this was around 385 AD. Between the age of fourteen and sixteen years of age, Patrick was taken prisoner by a group of Irish raiders who took him to Ireland where he spent six years as a slave in captivity. The precise location is not recorded but many claim this to be at Mount Slemish, near to Ballymena in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It is also known he worked as a shepherd.

Slemish, County Antrim. Photo by Albert Bridge.

He did escape when he was around 22-23 years of age. After that and according to his own documented writing God spoke to him in a dream and told him he had to leave Ireland and then when he returned to Britain he had a second dream that he was to go back to Ireland as a missionary. St Patrick began his religious training, and it lasted more than fifteen years. He was ordained as a priest by St Germanus, and then sent back to Ireland with the task of ministering to the few Christians already in Ireland and to begin to convert the Irish to Christianity. He was later made a bishop.

Ireland at that time was a country full of pagan beliefs and strong fixed cultures. Patrick would have been aware of this and also fluent in the Irish language. Rathern that fight against that he incorporated his Christian teachings with their old beliefs. An example of this was the creation of the Celtic Cross where he added the sun in the centre of the standard Christian cross. He also used the common growing shamrock to explain concept of the Holy Trinity. Its three leaves represented God the Father, God the Son and God the Holy Spirit, A classical myth is that he drove the snakes out of Ireland, but the reality was that they never existed in Ireland in the first place. All I can tell you is there are no snaked in Ireland, so read from that what you will.

St. Patrick’s Day is celebrated on the 17th March and is believed to be the date of his death though again this is not officially recorded anywhere. Historians believe he died at Saul which is near Downpatrick in Northern Ireland around the year 461.

Enda McLarnon is an avid reader of anything to do with the history of Ireland and Northern Ireland in particular. This includes the Northern Ireland Troubles.  If you want to find out more then please visit his site at Northern Ireland History.

I am an avid reader of anything to do with Irish History and have been studying this subject for many year. I trust you find this article informative.

https://www.facebook.com/enda.mclarnon

 

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How the Irish Saved Civilization

How the Irish Saved Civilization

How the Irish Saved Civilization: The Untold Story of Ireland’s Heroic Role From the Fall of Rome to the Rise of Medieval Europe (The Hinges of History)

How the Irish Saved Civilization: The Untold Story of Ireland's Heroic Role From the Fall of Rome to the Rise of Medieval Europe (The Hinges of History)

The perfect St. Patrick’s Day gift, and a book in the best tradition of popular history — the untold story of Ireland’s role in maintaining Western culture while the Dark Ages settled on Europe.

Every year millions of Americans celebrate St. Patrick’s Day, but they may not be aware of how great an influence St. Patrick was on the subsequent history of civilization. Not only did he bring Christianity to Ireland, he instilled a sense of literacy and learning that would create the conditions that allowed Ireland to become “the isle of saints and scholars” — and thus preserve Western culture while Europe was being overrun by barbarians.

In this entertaining and compelling narrative, Thomas Cahill tells the story of how Europe evolved from the classical age of Rome to the medieval era. Without Ireland, the transition could not have taken place. Not only did Irish monks and scribes maintain the very record of Western civilization — copying manuscripts of Greek and Latin writers, both pagan and Christian, while libraries and learning on the continent were forever lost — they brought their uniquely Irish world-view to the task.

As Cahill delightfully illustrates, so much of the liveliness we associate with medieval culture has its roots in Ireland. When the seeds of culture were replanted on the European continent, it was from Ireland that they were germinated.

In the tradition of Barbara Tuchman’s A Distant Mirror, How The Irish Saved Civilization reconstructs an era that few know about but which is central to understanding our past and our cultural heritage. But it conveys its knowledge with a winking wit that aptly captures the sensibility of the unsung Irish who relaunched civilization.In this delightful and illuminating look into a crucial but little-known “hinge” of history, Thomas Cahill takes us to the “island of saints and scholars,” the Ireland of St. Patrick and the Book of Kells. Here, far from the barbarian despoliation of the continent, monks and scribes laboriously, lovingly, even playfully preserved the West’s written treasury. When stability returned in Europe, these Irish scholars were instrumental in spreading learning, becoming not only the conservators of civilization, but also the shapers of the medieval mind, putting their unique stamp on Western culture.

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10 Most Beautiful Places in Ireland


Top 10 MOST BEAUTIFUL Places in IRELAND | Essential Irish Travel Guide

Traveling to Ireland or Northern Ireland? From Dublin to Belfast and everything in between, these are the Top 10 Essential Things to Do on the island of Ireland. Alex and Marko the Vagabrothers guide you to the very best of the Emerald Isle.

By the Vagabrothers.

 

 

Lonely Planet Ireland (Travel Guide)

Lonely Planet Ireland (Travel Guide)

Lonely Planet Ireland is your passport to the most relevant, up-to-date advice on what to see and skip, and what hidden discoveries await you. Slurp oysters and clap your hands to spirited fiddle music in a lively Galway pub, explore medieval castles in Dublin and beyond, or set off amid vibrant green hills toward Atlantic coastal trails; all with your trusted travel companion. Get to the heart of Ireland and begin your journey now!

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Lonely Planet Ireland (Travel Guide)

Lonely Planet Ireland (Travel Guide)

Lonely Planet Ireland (Travel Guide)

 

Lonely Planet: The world’s leading travel guide publisher

Lonely Planet Ireland is your passport to the most relevant, up-to-date advice on what to see and skip, and what hidden discoveries await you. Slurp oysters and clap your hands to spirited fiddle music in a lively Galway pub, explore medieval castles in Dublin and beyond, or set off amid vibrant green hills toward Atlantic coastal trails; all with your trusted travel companion. Get to the heart of Ireland and begin your journey now!

Inside Lonely Planet Ireland Travel Guide:

  • Full-colour maps and images throughout
  • Highlights and itineraries help you tailor your trip to your personal needs and interests
  • Insider tips to save time and money and get around like a local, avoiding crowds and trouble spots
  • Essential info at your fingertips hours of operation, phone numbers, websites, transit tips, prices
  • Honest reviews for all budgets – eating, sleeping, sight-seeing, going out, shopping, hidden gems that most guidebooks miss
  • Cultural insights give you a richer, more rewarding travel experience – including
  • customs, history, art, literature, music, landscapes, sports, food and drink
  • Free, convenient pull-out Dublin map (included in print version), plus over 86 colour maps
  • Covers Dublin, Waterford, Kilkenny, Cork, Kerry, Kildare, Limerick, Clare, Galway, Sligo, Donegal, The Midlands, Louth, Belfast, Armagh, Derry, and more

The Perfect Choice: Lonely Planet Ireland , our most comprehensive guide to Ireland, is perfect for both exploring top sights and taking roads less travelled.

  • Looking for just the highlights of Ireland? Check out Lonely Planet Discover Ireland guide, a photo-rich guide to the country’s most popular attractions.
  • Looking for a guide focused on Dublin? Check out Lonely Planet Dublin guide for a comprehensive look at all the city has to offer.

Authors: Written and researched by Lonely Planet.

About Lonely Planet: Since 1973, Lonely Planet has become the world’s leading travel media company with guidebooks to every destination, an award-winning website, mobile and digital travel products, and a dedicated traveller community. Lonely Planet covers must-see spots but also enables curious travellers to get off beaten paths to understand more of the culture of the places in which they find themselves.

 

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Rick Steves Ireland 2017

Rick Steves Ireland 2017

Rick Steves Ireland 2017Avalon Travel Publishing

You can count on Rick Steves to tell you what you really need to know when traveling in Ireland.

With this guide, you can explore lively Dublin, quaint Kilkenny, and the moss-draped ruins of the Ring of Kerry. Navigate meandering back roads that lead to windswept crags on the dramatic Dingle Peninsula. Explore Ireland’s revered past by following St. Patrick’s footsteps to the Rock of Cashel. Marvel at Newgrange, the mysterious mound older than the pyramids; then connect with today’s Irish culture by grabbing a pint at the local pub, enjoying the fiddle music, and jumping into conversations that buzz with brogue.

Rick’s candid, humorous advice will guide you to good-value hotels and restaurants. He’ll help you plan where to go and what to see, depending on the length of your trip. You’ll get up-to-date recommendations on what is worth your time and money. More than just reviews and directions, a Rick Steves guidebook is a tour guide in your pocket.

 

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